ladysaltina:

8eyedspy:

i showed this to somebody and now i’m excited for nothing lol i love this film so much

what film is this from? I must see it

It’s from Tetsuo the Iron Man (1989). Much Japanese cyberpunk. Such clash of the body and technology. Wow.

(Source: empiregrotesk)

How I feel after daring to write an academic paper about Half-Life.

How I feel after daring to write an academic paper about Half-Life.

On Edge, Eastern Passage, 2009

On Edge, Eastern Passage, 2009

York Redoubt, outside Halifax. N.S

York Redoubt, outside Halifax. N.S

Yarmouth Shark Scramble 2012

Yarmouth Shark Scramble 2012

2009
Probably ISO 400 on RC paper.

2009

Probably ISO 400 on RC paper.

How to not be an asshole: notes on mobility and accessible parking

This morning I went to the farmer’s market with my family. We parked in an accessible parking zone with a permit displayed. When my parents returned to our station wagon, they found this note under the wiper:

(Text of note:  Four able-bodied people got out of this car. I’ll have my mother walk from across the street. It’s okay.)

  I feel sorry that your mother had to walk. Small distances are much farther for people who have mobility challenges. Unfortunately, you miscounted. Only three able-bodied people got out of our car. My mother has multiple sclerosis, genius.

  My mom is one of the luckier people affected by this inflammatory disease. She has the remitting-relapsing  form of MS, rather than the more devastating primary-progressive. This means that she has good days and bad days, mobility wise. Some days are very challenging for her, others are better. Some days, it is difficult to tell that she has a mobility issue at a glance. Today was one of those days. Today was a good day.  

  What is most heart-breaking about my parents finding this note on their windshield is how patient and understanding they were. My father said that he would happily have moved had you approached us and asked to use the space. My mother was pleased that she had been mistaken for an able-bodied person because this meant that she was having, you know, a better day. Her limp and difficulty walking were not as apparent on this particular morning. That’s a victory for her.  My parents, as a caretaker and a person with a mobility disability understood your frustration.  They put this note behind them and moved on.  

  I’m not so forgiving. I’m actually kind of an asshole, and I’m willing to speak out and say that what you did is not only ignorant, but really NOT okay. It’s not okay.  I understand that it is incredibly hard to be a caretaker for a person who faces a mobility (or other) challenge. The world is not very easy to navigate, nor is it welcoming, for people that have visible disabilities, for people that move at a slower pace. Dealing with this is very alienating and I can see why you were frustrated. Here’s a newsflash:

Your frustration does not give you lisence to police other people’s disability status. Your frustration does not allow you to be a fuckwad. Your frustration does not entitle you to judge who is able-bodied and who is disabled. 

I’m going to give you the benefit of the doubt and hope that you just don’t know that this is not an okay way to behave.  Let’s look at this as a “teachable moment.”  Here’s how you can not be a presumptive jerk when dealing with accessible parking:

Accessible parking is for “persons who are mobility disabled.” The parking is “on a first come, first serve basis.” 

Don’t assume that these spots are only for people who use wheelchairs. Don’t assume that these spaces are for seniors. Don’t fucking assume anything about anyone’s disability. You can’t know. Even a young, seemingly able-bodied person may have a mobility issue. 

I hope this has been instructive. Thank you for your time.

Citations:

http://www.halifax.ca/traffic/reports/AccessibleParkingSpaces.html

Top results for questions and phrases on Google, March 12th, 2012

For lack of a better word

For lack of a better word